Tag Archives: #empowerment

Well-Read Black Girl

 

well read black girl

Well-Read Black Girl by Glory Edim literally gave me all the feels. I first caught interest in reading this book on her Instagram @wellreadblackgirl. Here she posts anything and everything related to literature and incorporates all of the #blackgirlmagic. So I literally don’t even know what to say to continue because this book was just that amazing.

I loved learning about how each author fell in love with reading, and what experiences they took away from what reading taught them in their early stages of life into womanhood. Each authors story was different and you were able to feel and understand why reading changed their lives and how in a way, it was an outlet. @Gabby3shabby aka Gabyy Sidibe, ya’ll know her for her character as Precious in Push and Becky Williams from Empire. Her story, whew chile! It stuck out to me the most because she talked about growing up she wasn’t the favorite child and reading was an escape for her essentially. All she wanted to do was stick to herself and mind her own business. Her father was religious and her mother seemed to just do what her husband asked, so Gabby grew up not understanding/liking how when it came to her fathers religious beliefs she had to be the stay at home wife, and her brother could do as he pleased. So, because she went against the grain her relationship with her family just wasn’t the typical.

Gabby says, “It took a while for me to unlearn the bad lessons my parents taught me about my existence by accident, as well as the bad lessons the media has been teaching me on purpose (that’s another story entirely), but I’m glad I have learned. I’m even grateful for the bad lessons I was taught in the first place. As it turns out, I’m pretty stubborn, so teaching me that my life would be bad fueled my ambition to have the best life possible. And I do. Ahmed is still both my parents’ favorite child, and that’s fine. I’m the one who grew up to be rich, so they can all suck it.” That last part! (emoji clapping hands). I just felt exhilarated for you Gabby because it was like you were saying, ‘hey I may not have had the ideal childhood and what you all expected me but the gag is, I made it and I’m here. And hello… it doesn’t help that you’re rich! Go girl, you give me so much inspiration!

This book I think will show future generations of women of all ages to embrace who they are. We as black woman are so powerful, and we can do so much! If only we did things like this, instead of what only society shows of how the black women is always “black and angry.” I digress…because baby! I can give ya’ll a full rant about what I think society thinks us black women can’t do. Did you catch that?

I wish to all who is reading this post please get this book. If it made you feel like I did you won’t be disappointed! Plus, there’s a (poop emoji) ton of other books that each person discussed in their particular chapter. If you’re a nerd like me, you’ll be reading so much more! This book is inspirational, uplifting, empowering, and with an abundance of #blackgirlmagic Queen-dopeness you’ll feel like YOU CAN DO ANYTHING, and YOU CAN!

black girl magic

Little Bee; First Thoughts Fiction

littlebee cover

Little Bee by Chris Cleave took me forever to read simply because life got in the way. I had to start it over three times; with the third time being the final charm (pun intended).

Little Bee was about a young Nigerian refugee woman (Little Bee) who was released from her detention center and travels miles away to the only people she knows; the O’Rourke family who saved her life but also tried their hardest to forget the tragic incident of how they met. So I don’t spoil too much, this book I would say has a theme of ‘wanting to be free.’ Every character, small or large is suffering, or going through some type of journey that they only hope keeps them safe and sound on the other side. This book is about second chances. This book is about starting over the best way you know how but being scared (you know what-less) because you don’t know what the outcome will turn out to be.

What I loved about this book was each chapter alternated between Little Bee and Sarah’s (the wife in the story) perspective. Little Bee’s perspective was about survival, never forgetting where she came from, and trying her hardest to re-create herself in a world she really had no business being part of. Little Bee studied how people in England carried themselves because she thought that would be the key to saving her life. She felt like changing her vernacular and knowing facts about a world she would’ve never been placed in if it wasn’t that day on the beach with Sarah was her out. Her way of being free and starting over.

For Sarah, she too was about surviving but in the sense of, she had to focus on the present and not go back to who she was. A woman who was lost and just seemed to go through the motions. Essentially, she was changing for the better but still held on to who she used to be. Sarah was a people pleaser, but failed to focus on how to properly love, balance, and care for her family. It was like she was in denial about things and she knew it but she didn’t take the steps to figure out how to get out of those moments. So she went about her daily routine, struggling because she never spoke up until it was too late; but redeeming herself when Little Bee came back into her life was her way of being free. Helping someone else was they key for her life to be better.

Little Bee and Sarah are one in the same, and it’s crazy because their lives were totally different prior to when they were put together and it changed everything. Their willingness to help one another in a time of turmoil, both physically, and globally shaped who they became as women. They depended on each other and I think subconsciously knew that with all the secrets they kept they needed each other because one couldn’t survive without the other.

Chris Cleave also has another book,  entitled Incendiary. I enjoyed his style of writing  in Little Bee and hopefully you will too. Although it was a slow read in the beginning the relationships the characters developed with each other continuously peaked my interest. Each chapter there was something I wasn’t expecting. A story of two women trying to survive in a world they felt like they didn’t belong too.